Free Friday: American VS Australian Vocabulary Differences

So you’ve been hitting the books hard [studying a lot] and now you’re ready to take all this English to a native speaking country. The problem is….where are you going? Even though the US, Australia, UK, etc speak English, they all have their own, unique vocabulary for some items.

Even when speaking the language, confusion can happen when we come across a word we aren’t familiar with, even when we thought we knew it! I, an English teacher, experienced this confusion when living in Australia and I asked for a lemonade and got a Sprite (lemon-lime soda). What I should have asked for was a lemon squash.

Lucky for you…you have me, and a gazillion [a very large amount] other web resources out there to help you. For today’s Free Friday lesson, I’ll provide you with a list of some unique words and their OZ translations, a YouTube video with even more words, and some links to find some other information.

American VS Australian English

A lot of these words + more can be found in this YouTube video made by the Browns:
Aussie American Words
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWu3LhfA3fw

 

Still itchin’ for more [want more] Australian? Then check out these links on Pinterest, which also includes some British differences too!

http://www.pinterest.com/brignacgirl/australian-lingo/
http://www.pinterest.com/explore/british-english/

 

See even more translations here…
http://www.statsci.org/smyth/ozus.html

 

Do you have any more differences you’d like to share? Any experiences of not knowing these differences abroad? Share with us in the comments, and of course: Sharing is Caring ♥ ♥  share this post with a friend….

Word of the weekend: Vicarious

Word of the weekend: Vicarious

I’ve been living vicariously through others’ photos and stories during these past few weeks as the summer is ending, and it can be an excellent way to experience adventure!IMG_0561.PNG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtesy of: Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary

Free Friday: Listening Comprehension with TED

Practice Listening Comprehension & Vocabulary with TEDtalks Well, today is an excellent day to not only provide you with my Free Friday lesson…err, umm..Saturday lesson, but to also teach you the phrase, “it’s better late than never!” Something is ‘better … Continue reading

Free Friday: Vocabulary Lesson

As if I don’t have enough on my plate as it is, I’ve decided to re-introduce a weekly component of the blog and add “Free Friday,” in which I will be uploading some free lessons. I already post learning resources and opportunities as it is; however, this has a fun name!

First, did you notice my idiom related to food in the first sentence? “to have enough on my plate” is an idiom that means, I already have a lot going on, or I am already pretty busy. You will change the pronoun “my” to reflect the correct person (his, her, their, our, etc), and you can replace ‘enough’ with other words like: a lot, so much, etc…  OR, you can use it the opposite way and say, “I don’t have a lot on my plate.” This would mean you’re not busy at all!

This week includes a vocabulary lesson, and if you haven’t guessed already, it’s related to FOOD. You can check out my other food related information [more idioms] here.

Review vocabulary words, match their synonyms, and complete the sentence blanks with their appropriate word. You can even go one step farther, and create your own sentences in the comment section for me to review and check! Click the link below to review the lesson, and be sure to practice your writing, by writing them in a notebook:
Vocab_FoodEating      <~~vocabulary lesson link is this**

Happy Studying! ♥



Have you finished the vocabulary lesson? Check your answers here: Vocab_ANS_FoodEating

How did you do? Let me know, and don’t forget to write your own sentences to practice!

Please feel free to print/use this and all lesson material provided on English Outside the Box; however, names of creators (including English Outside the Box) must not be removed, and proper credit must be given.
This lesson came from Pathways 2. A National Geographic book written by B.T. Chase & K.L Johannsen.

Word of the Weekend: productive

Why is it important? This word can be used personally and professionally, and productivity is important for both areas.

I am utilizing my surgery downtime to be extremely productive with several projects. How about you?

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Courtesy: Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary

Word Crimes Part 1: Vocabulary

Weird Al Yankovic is back! Who is Weird Al? Do a quick Google search, and you may recognize his iconic look, or perhaps his song parodies. My memory of his music dates back to the ’90s, and his comical (funny) versions of trendy (popular) songs make it hard not to dance and sing along. One of his current hits off the album, “Mandatory Fun,” is a song that’s perfect for this blog, and for language learning! It’s called “Word Crimes.” I was stoked (so excited) when a dear friend shared it with me, and it has inspired me to use it for multiple learning opportunities. The first being… VOCABULARY.

What is a word crime?
Oh, we’ve all seen them. It’s the incorrect use of articles, using “it’s” as a possessive instead of a contraction, saying eXpresso rather than espresso, and using letters and numbers to spell words. These, of course, are just a few, and Weird Al points out a lot more in his song. I will definitely be highlighting some of the grammar mistakes he pokes fun at (makes fun of), but will start off defining some of the vocabulary so you fully understand the song and meaning. You can watch the video here, which includes some of the lyrics.

However, to read all of the lyrics, go here. (if these links don’t work, just Google the video and lyrics: Weird Al Yankovic – Word Crimes)

VOCABULARY

  1. conjugategrammar: to list the different forms of a verb that show number, person, tense, etc..
  2. flunk: to get a failing grade in a course/subject / [+ object] to give a failing grade
  3. mock (someone):  to laugh at or make fun of (someone or something) especially by copying an action or a way of behaving or speaking
  4. familiarize: to make someone familiar with, give them knowledge about something
  5. nomenclature: a system of names for things especially in science
  6. literacy: the ability to read and write
  7. stammer: to speak with many pauses and repetitions because you have a speech problem or because you are very nervous, frightened, etc.
  8. raised: chiefly US : to take care of and teach (a child) : to bring up or rear (a child)  [*EX: “..like people who were, Never raised in a sewer..” -Word Crimes]
  9. sewer: a pipe that is usually underground and that is used to carry off water and sewage
  10. moron: an idiot, someone stupid
  11. apostrophe: the punctuation mark ʼ -used for contractions, possessives, or plural form of letters/numbers
  12. mangling:  to do (something) badly : to ruin (something) because of carelessness or a lack of skill
  13. danglin’: shortened from- dangling: grammar: when a word isn’t accurately attached to another part of a sentence
  14. drama: a situation or series of events that is exciting and that affects people’s emotions
  15. cunning: cleverness or skill especially at tricking people in order to get something
  16. homophones: a word that is pronounced like another word but is different in meaning, origin, or spelling
  17. emphasis: special importance or attention given to something
  18. coincidence: a situation in which events happen at the same time in a way that is not planned or expected
  19. smack: to hit something/someone hard
  20. crowbar: a metal bar that has a thin flat edge at one end and is used to open or lift things
  21. apparent: easy to see or understand/ obvious
  22. incoherent: not able to talk or express yourself in a clear way that can be easily understood; not logical or well-organized : not easy to understand
  23. prose: writing that is not poetry : ordinary writing
  24. lost cause: a person or thing that is certain to fail
  25. give up: [phrasal verb]- to quit; to stop trying to do something
 Vocabulary: Courtesy of Merriam Webster Learner’s Dictionary

Hopefully this list of vocabulary will enhance your repertoire (collection) of English vocabulary, and help you understand the song. Check back soon for some grammar explanations related to this song, and…

please share this information with someone who loves English, grammar, vocabulary, Weird Al…or just, life ♥  Happy Studying ♥ 

Are there any other words you don’t understand, or other lyrics that do not make sense? Don’t be shy! Feel free to ask for more explanations and definitions in the comment section below.

Words 1 & 2 of the Weekend: Independence Day & patriotism

Oh yeah, words of the weekend have come early! Happy 4th of July!

Why are these words useful?

It’s an important holiday here in the States. So whether you’re living here, are interested in American culture, or are just interested in English, it could be helpful for you to know what today is celebrating. Patriotism is something that everyone and anyone can feel, and I want to feel your patriotism!

What is something interesting from your country that you can share?

 

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Courtesy: Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary

Words 1 & 2 of the Weekend: narrow-minded & bigotry

Why are they useful?

These words will be featured in an upcoming blog post for you to practice reading, reflection and writing. They are both ugly words, that can cause harm and reflect hatred…which is something none of us should have in our hearts. Finding ways to open your mind can eliminate any bigoted ideas. Learning to accept other’s differences can make the world much more peaceful. I could go on with peace and love… but I think you get it. 🙂

How do you open your mind?

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Courtesy: Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary

Words 1 & 2 of the Weekend: Pack & Rearrange

Why are they useful?

Packing is something you will definitely do in your life, if you haven’t already. You’ll pack for a vacation, when you move to a new place, your child’s lunch, or diaper bag, the list could go on. While you’re doing this, chances are, you’ll need more room because things won’t fit. So, what will you do? You’ll rearrange your luggage/box/bag! This is something I am currently doing, getting ready for our big trip today!

EX: Even though I packed my suitcase early, I forgot about some things I need to bring. I had to rearrange my clothes to create some extra space.

When’s the last time you had to rearrange what you had already packed?

 

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Courtesy: Merriam Webster Learner’s Dictionary

Words 1 & 2 of the Weekend: Anxious & Relieved

Why are they useful? They’re common feelings, especially around the current World Cup events… Or of course, anything you can feel nervous about. 😉 They’re opposite feelings too. So, you feel relieved, when you no longer feel anxious.

EX: Paulo was feeling very anxious before Brazil’s game, but was relieved with their victory.

What are you relieved about that made you anxious before?

 

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Courtesy: Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary