Gerund Vs Infinitive- Part 2

Hey guys, I’m back!! As promised we are going to continue the part 1 post to discuss more about Gerunds vs Infinitives. I hope you understood everything on the first post, but if not, don’t mind asking questions..

Now, we already went through the gerund part of this grammar topic, so let’s talk about when and how we should use the infinitive. First of all, I want to clarify the difference between the infinitive form and the base form of a verb. The infinitive is composed of “to” + a verb, whereas the base form is only composed of the verb. For instance, the verb “sleep” in its infinitive form is “to sleep” and its base form is “sleep”.

As the gerund, the infinitive also comes as a noun in the subject or object position.

  • As a subject: although is not so common to see infinitives as subjects, it’s not impossible, so we will list it here.

To swim is my favorite hobby.
To dance is an amazing activity.

  • As a subject complement: this case is more common to happen than the first one. The infinitive complements the subject and between them there MUST be a linking verb.

My favorite hobby is to swim. (notice that I’ve just paraphrased the last example, which shows that both exist but, as said, this one is more common than the other)

  • After adjectives: infinitives often follow adjectives to give reasons.

He was sad to say goodbye to his family members.
The company owner was anxious to make the next move.

  • Verbs that are followed by infinitives:
    • afford
    • agree
    • appear
    • arrange
    • ask
    • care
    • decide
    • demand
    • expect
    • fail
    • hope
    • learn
    • manage
    • mean
    • offer
    • plan
    • prepare
    • pretend
    • promise
    • refuse
    • seem
    • volunteer
    • wait
    • want
    • wish
  • Besides these verbs, there are also verbs that can be followed by either a gerund or an infinitive WITHOUT a change in meaning:
    • begin
    • continue
    • hate
    • like
    • love
    • prefer
    • start
  • And the verbs that can be followed by both WITH  a change in meaning:
    • remember
    • forget
    • stop

I would like to make a side note to discuss these 3 verbs due to the change in meaning whether they are followed by the gerund or infinitive.

Remember and forget follow the same idea, meaning: “remember/forget you have done something”  or related to memory in the sense of “having/not having memory about a fact in the past” when is used with a gerund; or meaning “to forget/remember you need to do something” when is used with an infinitive.

Don’t forget to practice when you finish studying. ( In this case, somebody is advising you to practice later, hence this action is placed in the future)
She forgot giving me her keys yesterday. (Here, the woman forgot she has given the keys to her friend, so the action is placed in the past)

Remember to talk to your boss about the vacation trip. (In this sentence, the person had to remember to do it, so the action is placed in the future)
I remember seeing him last week at the gym. (In this one, I remember I saw a friend last week, thus the action is placed in the past)

Stop does not follow the same thinking but it’s even easier to understand and use. Stop with a gerund means you quit an addiction, a habit or anything you used to do. However, when it is used with an infinitive, it brings the idea of “in order to”.

I stopped my car to talk to an old friend. (In this sentence, I stopped driving my car in order to talk to an old friend, so the action was the reason why I stopped)
I stopped drinking soda 6 years ago. (Here, I quit doing something I used to do, drink soda)

So, that’s all for now..Please, let me know if I made myself clear on both posts and how you are improving on this topic. It will be my pleasure to share more information if you need :):) Have a nice rest of the week!!!♥

Gerund vs Infinitive – Part 1

Hiii everyone!! I got this amazing invitation from Jennifer to be here contributing to the blog and your learning and I am sooo excited for it. Why? Because I was/am Jennifer’s student just as you are, so as an ESL learner, I am sure we have a lot to share on this journey of learning English.

Let me tell you a bit of my own journey…Last year I lived in San Diego for almost 10 months and it was the best time of my life (if you’re thinking about going for an exchange year, I encourage you to do it! You won’t regret it, actually you won’t want to go home haha). When I moved, I already knew a few things in English and I started school at a High Intermediate level. I could understand and read well, but I couldn’t speak and that was my main goal: to speak the best I could, with the least accent possible (I warn you from the beginning: You will always have an accent and that’s fine, it shows your identity). I got to Proficiency level, then I decided to take a TOEFL preparation course and, later, the test. Besides school, I lived with a host family whom I loooove ♥ and I’m certain they had a huge contribution to my learning. Ok, let me cut to the chase (idiom: to focus on what is important; to skip the unnecessary part) and go to what really matters here..

I chose GERUNDS for today’s post so we can kill two birds with one stone (idiom: when you solve two problems at one time): 1) clarify a topic commonly confused or misunderstood and 2) write for week 3 of #AugLP.

As you all might know, a gerund is the “ing” form of the verb, but how is it used? What part of speech or functions does it fit under? Well, this varies by the context. The gerund is used as a noun and it can fit the subject or object position.

  • As subject: when it’s in the beginning of a sentence working as the subject of the verb (verb MUST be singular)

Eating is the best thing to do in Italy.
Living abroad is a good way to learn a new language.

  • As a direct object: when complementing the verb directly

I love running by the sea.
I consider littering a serious crime.

  • Preposition + gerund: after every preposition that is followed by a verb, the verb comes in its gerund form

After waiting for 45 minutes, it was finally my turn to ride the roller-coaster.
I always feed my dog before going out.
I don’t know much about selling stocks.
I congratulated her for passing the exam.

  • As a subject complement: the subject complement can be a noun, an adjective or a pronoun that describes the subject. Between the subject and the complement there must be a linking verb (most common one is the verb to be).

My favorite activity is swimming.
The best tip for a good performance on a test is sleeping well the night before.

  • As an object complement: just like the subject complement, the object complement gives more detail to the object by describing it with a noun, pronoun or adjective.

I found the student sleeping during the class.
I had issues getting used to the blog editor.

The last part I consider the hardest to associate since there is no rule, only memorization and practice. But, seriously, with practice it starts coming naturally and you will not find it challenging anymore.

  • Verbs and phrases always followed by the gerund: the list below contains the most common verbs and phrases for this category
    • admit
    • advise
    • avoid
    • be used to
    • can’t help
    • can’t stand
    • consider
    • deny
    • discuss
    • dislike
    • end up
    • enjoy
    • feel like
    • finish
    • get used to
    • give up
    • go on
    • have difficulty
    • have problems
    • have trouble
    • imagine
    • it’s no use
    • it’s worthwhile
    • keep
    • look forward to
    • mention
    • mind
    • miss
    • recommend
    • quit
    • spend time
    • suggest
    • understand
    • waste time
    • work at

Besides that, there is still more specific content comparing the use of gerunds and infinitives, which is going to be discussed on a future post, part 2.

Let’s practice???

Create examples about yourself using each of the cases we’ve studied for the gerund and let me know more about you!! Does it sound good?? :))

Overall, I hope this post has been helpful so far and feel free to get in touch with me or Jennifer for any questions or explanations. Don’t forget to practice!!! Have a nice week, guys!